The Truth About Dog Food Protein

The Truth About Dog Food Protein

Dog food protein is essential to your dog. Dogs need more protein than humans. Interestingly, protein is not always the focus of dog food. Wikipedia has several examples from the 1800s that show that dog food focuses on cheese, milk, buttermilk, oats, barley flour, potatoes, and animal fats. Dog food has made great strides. Now, dog food companies are focusing on dog food protein, which requires many different ingredients to produce pet food that matches the amino acids needed by dogs.

These can all work synergistically by using a variety of different food combinations. Some people believe that because dogs are the direct descendants of wolves, their protein requirements are 100% mainly meat. Another argument is that dogs are born scavengers and eat basically everything, whether it is protein or not. Nevertheless, others still believe that with the domestication of dogs and the fact that they have lived with humans for thousands of years, they have evolved into incomplete carnivores. In addition to these, there are more opinions.

Although dogs are designed to not only eat meat, they should thoroughly understand the meat that enters regular commercial dog food. This topic is very broad, so I try to focus on it. There is an incredible amount of information on this subject, some of which are quite frightening.

Commercial dog food often consists of a meat product and several other items that are usually carbohydrates or meat by-products. The top five ingredients listed on the side of a bag of dog food are often a basic summary of its 95% content. This is good, but the problem is when pet food companies modify the value of the product in the bag. There is no doubt that any dog ​​owner should pay close attention to these items, as well as the placement and wording of the items on the packaging.

Generally, when handling meat, the first 50% of slaughtered animals that can be used are considered “human grade”. Some people think that providing their dogs with “human grade” food is an appropriate solution to all their dog food needs. Many pet food companies use the term “human grade” as a general phrase to make some of their foods sound better than they actually are. Although the idea of ​​”human grade” food is great, it is not absolute.

Generally, when processing meat, the first 50% of slaughtered animals that can be used are considered “human grade”. Some people think that providing their dogs with “human grade” food is an appropriate solution to all their dog food needs. Many pet food companies use the term “human grade” as a generic phrase to make some of their foods sound better than they actually are. Although the idea of ​​”human grade” food is great, it is not absolute.

To say that a food is human-level food is relatively misleading. This word means that the food is good enough to be eaten by humans. This has nothing to do with the processing of the product. The term “made with human-grade ingredients” does not mean that the final product is human-grade. In short, the processing of human-grade meat may actually not be suitable for human consumption at all. AAFCO (American Association of Feed Control Officials) does not even have a definition of “human grade” ingredients.

Some of the key items found in commercial pet food are animal leftovers that cannot be sold in local grocery stores. These items of animals are usually the brain, bones, eyeballs, blood, intestines, lungs, spleen, liver, ligaments, membranes and fatty debris. These leftovers are called “by-products” and are often used in pet food. One good thing about understanding animal by-products is that hair, horns, hooves, beaks, and feathers are not part of the equation. As a general rule of thumb, high-end pet food does not even use meat by-products.

If a person registers on the AAFCO website and investigates animal by-products, the results can be considered encouraging. An example of this is that 4D meat (dead, sick, dying, or disabled) is considered “adulterated” and should not be included in pet food unless it has been processed to the extent that all dangerous microorganisms have been removed. The extent of damage. Obviously, a dog food with meat by-products as the main ingredient is not as good as a dog food that contains specific meats and then lists the by-products.

The next point is the fact that dog food is divided into single and multiple protein products. This means that a single protein is a form of meat. Multiple proteins (such as beef and turkey) will be considered two or more types of meat. Some people think that there is no reasonable reason to feed animals a single protein food. Because there are multiple sources of protein, dogs can get several different amino acids from each meat product. By running two proteins in dog food at the same time, it is easier to make the correct amino acid mixture. In addition, a variety of proteins means fewer fillers, and fewer fillers means your animal is smaller and the product is easier to digest.

One of the arguments for the presence of grains in dog food is that the amino acids needed by dogs can be obtained through various combinations of meat and grain products. The debate is usually about the quality of the meat and grain products used. It should not be forgotten that the protein content in grains is slightly different, such as corn, soybeans, and oats.

A high percentage of dogs have food allergies. Corn is a very common additive, so much so that some people think that it is constantly included in dog food making it a common culprit of dog food allergies. Soy is another culprit. Some people believe that the number of dogs with food allergies may be as high as 20%, while others believe that this number is much lower than 10%.

Regardless of the situation, dog food companies have created hundreds or even thousands of different foods for dogs, which should meet your dog’s needs, even if he does have allergies. Obviously, a balanced, pure meat diet will meet all the essential amino acid marks and avoid potential grain allergies. However, meat allergies are another reality, which complicates the whole concept of dog food protein.

Some of the standard meat allergies for dogs are chicken and beef, the two main types of meat in most dog foods. Although there are solutions available. Lamb, duck, venison and turkey are other relatively safe alternatives. Lamb used to be a hypoallergenic panacea, but dogs have recently become allergic to this meat product. Introducing these new ingredients may be what your dog needs, and if the new food contains venison or lamb, your dog may eat well.

Dog food protein should be a key element in your dog food purchase process. No matter what you think about the pedigree of a dog, it is good to understand the definition of protein and multiple proteins in pet food. If you have any further questions about dog food protein (or this article opens up some questions for you), you really should delete the information online. There are countless different opinions, facts, and data that can help you become an informed pet owner that your dog will appreciate.

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